Sleep apnea Treatmet

Sleep Apnea Treatment

Here Are A Few Ways to Keep Your Airways Open. Have you ever tried using medicine to cure your sleep apnea, and it wasn’t effective? Discover other natural treatments that may assist you. Over 25 million Americans suffer from obstructive sleep apnea, according to a survey conducted by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Sleep apnea is more than an annoying sleep disorder; it might be deadly.

If you have sleep apnea, your breathing is interrupted while asleep. This can happen dozens or even hundreds of times throughout the night. As a result, you never reach the deep, restorative levels of sleep that your body needs. This leaves you feeling exhausted during the day, but it also puts you at risk for serious health problems. There are two types of sleep apnea: obstructive and central. Obstructive sleep apnea, the more common type, occurs when the muscles in your throat relax and collapse while you are asleep, blocking your airway. Central sleep apnea is less common and occurs when your brain doesn’t send the right signals to your muscles to keep your airway open.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is a condition in which breathing stops for short periods during sleep. These periods of controlled breathing can last from a few seconds to minutes. They may happen 30 times or more an hour. Usually, sleep apnea people don’t know they have it because it only occurs during sleep.

Sleep apnea usually is a chronic (ongoing) condition that disrupts your sleep. When your breathing pauses or becomes very shallow, you’ll often move out of deep sleep and light sleep. As a result, the quality of your sleep is poor, which makes you tired during the day. Sleep apnea can be caused by several things, including excess weight and enlarged tonsils or adenoids.

Sleep apnea can occur at any age, but it’s more common in adults. It affects men more often than women. Sleep apnea also happens more often in overweight people who have a family history of the condition or have certain medical conditions such as heart disease, stroke, or diabetes.

Types of Sleep Apnea

There are two types of sleep apnea: obstructive and central.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is the more common type. It occurs when the muscles in your throat relax and collapse while you are asleep, blocking your airway.

The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. It occurs when the soft tissue in your throat collapses and blocks your airway. When this happens, you can’t breathe, and you snore loudly. Obstructive sleep apnea is more common in men and people who are overweight.

The following are some of the signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea:

  • Loud snoring
  •  Pauses in breathing during sleep
  • Gasping for air during sleep
  • Awakening with a dry mouth or sore throat
  • Morning headaches
  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Difficulty concentrating during the day
  • irritability
  • Depression

If you have obstructive sleep apnea, you may not know that you stop breathing during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea is usually diagnosed with a sleep study. The asleep research is a test done overnight in a sleep lab. During the test, you will be monitored while you sleep. The test can help your doctor determine if you have obstructive sleep apnea and how severe it is.

Central sleep apnea

Central sleep apnea is less common. It occurs when your brain doesn’t send the right signals to your muscles to keep your airway open. Central sleep apnea is less common than obstructive sleep apnea. It occurs when your brain doesn’t send the right signals to your muscles to keep your airway open. Central sleep apnea is more common in people with certain medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, or Parkinson’s disease. It is also more common in older adults.

The following are some of the signs and symptoms of central sleep apnea:

  • Pauses in breathing during sleep
  • Awaking with a dry mouth or sore throat
  • Morning headaches
  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Difficulty concentrating during the day
  • irritability
  • Depression

If you have central sleep apnea, you may not know that you stop breathing during sleep. Central sleep apnea is usually diagnosed with a sleep study. A sleep study is a test done overnight in a sleep lab. During the test, you will be monitored while you sleep. The test can help your doctor determine if you have central sleep apnea and how severe it is.

Mixed (or Complex) Sleep Apnea

Mixed sleep apnea is a combination of both obstructive and central sleep apnea. This type of sleep apnea is less common.

The following are some of the signs and symptoms of mixed sleep apnea:

  • Pauses in breathing during sleep
  • Gasping for air during sleep
  • Awakening with a dry mouth or sore throat
  • Morning headaches
  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Difficulty concentrating during the day
  • irritability
  • Depression

If you have mixed sleep apnea, you may not know that you stop breathing during sleep. Mixed sleep apnea is usually diagnosed with a sleep study. A sleep study is a test that is done overnight in a sleep.

 

4 Comments

Leave a Reply